Giulia Casati

Born in the Lecco Province, Giulia first came to America to work as an Au Pair and then decided to take an in depth look at College in America, where she's currently studying Anthropology and Spanish.


Today we are going to talk about one of the most confusing verb topics for English speakers. Ok, no it’s not the congiuntivo yet, so maybe the second most confusing: the past! In this article, we are going to mainly talk about two main tenses: passato prossimo and imperfetto.

Summer is about to end, so I thought: “What about some sun to celebrate this beautiful and sunny season?” - Also, as a hope to see it for a little while longer! So, that’s it. This month is all about the sole! Italy has always had a very strong and particular relationship with the sun due to its sunny weather that influences its people and atmosphe...

Welcome back to our tour of the Italian dialects. Today, we move East and we meet with the Cimbrian language which has Germanic origins and is historically located in the Italian regions of Trentino Alto-Adige and Veneto and is currently protected in the province of Trento. But let’s take a look at why this language was and is spoken here.

Often, we find out that Italian has words that English does not have and that English has words that Italian doesn’t. Words that define slight shades of meaning or even big differences we were not aware existed until we were taught about it! You’ll say “I know!” but do you know the difference between to know and to know? What am I talking about? Th...

Have you ever wonder why Italians say In bocca al lupo! to wish you luck? What does a mouth of a wolf have to do with my luck? And, above all, why do I have to be in its mouth to be lucky? Well, today we are going to see some of my favorite expressions in Italian, and they all have to deal with the word, or maybe I should say the animal, lupo – “wo...

Let’s continue our tour of Italy through its dialects! Next stop Piedmont! We are in the north-west of Italy, not too far from France and Switzerland in the north and next to Valle d’Aosta to the west, Lombardy to the east, and Liguria to the south. And today we are going to talk about Piemontéis, or Piedmontese! The dialect people speak here. Firs...

Here we are talking again about the Italian language. Today we are going to talk about grammar and one of the most confusing and probably one of the most common mistake for Italian learners: auxiliaries! Oh yeah, are you ready to start? Hopefully I’ll be able to help you out a little to better understand this topic.

Ay, Jing-a-di-jing hee haw hee haw: it's Dominick the Donkey! What does Dominik the Donkey have to do with the Italian language? Nothing you would say. But “è qui che casca l’asino!” - the donkey falls here. Wait, what does that mean? Well, my friend that’s what explaining to you today.  Apparently, donkeys are a very popular animal when talking ab...

Today, my dear friends, we are going to talk about you and I. What do I mean? Well, we are going to talk about subject pronouns. These teeny tiny words are used to express who is doing the action, and they are called subject pronoun because they actually are the subject of the sentence. They are used instead or names like Marco, Lucia and Cecilia,...

What am I saying? Isn’t this column supposed to be about Italian? Well, yes, but it’s also about Italy’s famous dialects, and today we are going to learn about one that maybe is not so famous: the “language” that is spoken in the region Valle d’Aosta, at the very north-west of Italy. What is it? Well, it’s kind of a complicated answer so let’s take...

Do you remember a few months ago when we talked about all the Italian expressions and sayings connected to food? Well, of course we said that food is a main component of Italian culture and tradition, so, why wouldn’t it be part of its language too? Well, there is another feature that is sometimes forgotten, but very important as well: vino! Oh, It...

Today we are going to talk about adjectives, all those words we use to describe an object or a person. In English it’s relatively a simple matter: the adjective (quality) always goes before the noun (object or person). For instance, the brown table will never be the table brown, or the old man won’t become the man old. Easy peasy.