MAGAZINE  

Ciao from Rome, welcome to the #103 magazine of We the Italians! I'd like to start this editorial by celebrating all the Italian American soldiers who lost their lives, in all the American wars: Monday May 28 is Memorial Day. To pay my respect, this year I've interviewed somebody who not only beautifully represents the Italians who have fought or s...

Cilento, terrain in the Region of Campania marked by gently-rolling hills covered in olive trees that see their reflection in the blue of the Tyrhennian, is pure magic and a crossroads between multiple populations and traditions. Traversed by savage torrents and thick woods of chestnuts and evergreens, this splendid landscape is also interspersed w...

The first historical references to the Roman ricotta cheese date from the description of cheese-making techniques provided in “De re rustica” by the Roman agronomist Columella in the 1st century BC. In those times, sheep's milk had three uses: the first religious, the second alimentary, as a food or drink, and the third to make both fresh and aged...

The origins of weaving in Longobucco are ancient and common to other areas of Calabria. It is said that inhabitants of the coasts of Calabria were taken as prisoners in raids by Turkish pirates. After a long period spent in the countries of the east, some women managed to return to their places of origin and brought with them the art of weaving, an...

Venzone, in the province of Udine, in Friuli Venezia Giulia, owes its fortune to the fact that it has been an obligatory passage to the north since the time of the Celts in 500 BC. Then the Romans made the town one of their stands along the route of the Via Julia Augusta from the site of Aquileia to Norico (now Central Austria). Such information is...

In 1727 Giandomenico Tiepolo was born, third son of Giambattista Tiepolo, the unrivaled painter of the Venetian Rococo who enchanted all the courts of Europe with his aerial style and very modern design. His mother was Cecilia Guardi, the sister of the Vedutist painters Francesco and Antonio. In short, Giandomenico was a double son of art, a concen...

Spaghetti cacio and pepper (pecorino romano cheese and pepper), like carbonara and amatriciana, has now become one of the symbols of Italian cuisine. It is prepared using D.O.P (protected designation of origin) ingredients. Pecorino romano is called cacio to distinguish it from pecorino produced in other parts of Italy. Most pecorino is produced o...

Nicknamed "The Good Pope", John XXIII, born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli, in a pontificate of just 5 years managed to undermine the former patterns of the Catholic Church and its power in Rome, giving the figure of the Pope a feature of familiarity. The Pope had become, as he liked to say, "a brother who speaks to the other brothers, become a father fo...

Villages, ancient towns, villas, Medieval castles, and archaeological ruins animate the Regional Park of the Castelli Romani, in the Province of Rome. Located in the Alban Hills, in the past the Castelli Romani were a favorite resort for the Capital's noble families as well as for Popes. 9,500 hectares of protected land, many animal species, such a...

The days are becoming long and hot, and it’s finally time for a vacation. Where do you choose to go? Is it to swap city life for the countryside views, wine glass in one hand and gelato in the other? Is it to meander through cobblestone streets soaking up the surrounding history while the man down the street plays a familiar Dean Martin tune on his...

In spring, between May 7th and May 10th, artistic illuminations, angels, archangels, games and spectacular fireworks are at the center of an intense ritual that the community of Ottaviano (Naples) dedicates to the patron saint, Michael, the archangel who led the angelic hosts in the fight against the rebel angels commanded by Lucifer, annihilating...

The Gardens of Villa Taranto are located on the promontory of Castagnola, along the road that connects Pallanza to Intra, on the western shore of Lake Maggiore. They were created by Neil Mc Eacharn (1184-1964), a captain of Scottish origin, a great lover of botany and Italy, which he had visited in his youth. In 1928 McEacharn returned to Italy wit...