Asked if she liked America, an Italian homeworker replied in 1911: "Not much, not much. In my country, people cook out-of doors, do the wash out-of-doors, tailor out-of-doors, make macaroni out-of-doors. And my people laugh, laugh all the time. In America, is "sopra, sopra!" [up, up, with a gesture of going upstairs]. Many people, one house; work,...

by Silvia Donati   Italian-American director Jonas Carpignano is the author of the film Mediterranea, which tells the story of two African migrants, Ayiva, played by Koudous Seihon, and Abas (Alassane Sy), as they try to make better lives for themselves in Italy, after traveling from Burkina Faso to Rosarno, in the southern region of Calabri...

Marc Cappelletti is a Philadelphia writer. A light snow is falling on the green awnings of Philadelphia's Ninth Street Market. It's a fleeting snow, melting almost as soon as it lands. Still, I marvel. It brings to mind the snow that fell in my grandfather's stories of his emigration from Italy to America, where he landed 85 years ago. &...

By Angelo Coniglio Many Americans of Italian descent make the same plaintive comment when asked about the origins of their immigrant ancestors: "My parents (or grandparents) never talked about it." I hope to help you discover long-lost information about your roots.   There are millions of descendants of Italians and Sicilians in the United...

by Rachel Silberstein When Angelo Bonsignore was a kid in Dyker Heights, he was always curious about the neighborhood. For one, what where those strange pillars he passed everyday on the way to school at P.S. 201, randomly erected on two corners of 11th Avenue near 79th Street?   Now a filmmaker and producer, Bonsignore began to research th...

For our 100th interview (happy birthday to us!!) we talk about a documentary that will be aired in two parts: the first two hours on February 17th at 9 P.M.EST and the second two hours a week later on February 24th at 9 P.M. EST. The documentary is called "The Italian Americans" and, in our honest opinion, will be a milestone for the Italian Americ...

1. Our intensity of discussion needs to come down a few notches. Us Italians are hot-blooded people. We are more inclined to speak what's going through our minds in a passionate way. Different opinions are just that, and we are not fighting when you hear a heated discussion.   We are just talking. My roommate in the US used to think I w...