Giulia Casati for Italian School NJ

Born in the Lecco Province, Giulia first came to America to work as an Au Pair and then decided to take an in depth look at College in America, where she's currently studying Anthropology and Spanish.http://www.italianschoolnj.com/


Everyday, I receive my Italian word of the day, and I must confess that lately I have received a lot of words that I either haven’t heard in forever or actually  have never heard anyone say them in an everyday conversation. So I looked into it and found more and more words that have stopped being part of the modern vocabulary of your average Italia...

It’s finally August! Time to rest and go on vacation. This year has been a crazy mess, and probably some of you won’t be able to go on vacation, and many people won’t be able to come to Italy, so I thought I’d bring the Italian sea to you. Let’s take a look at some of the many Italian expressions with mare, “sea.”  The most common is probably un ma...

Let’s jump back into our tour of the languages of Italy. We went through most of the north and now it is time to keep going down the boot and reach the region of Marche, to the center east of Italy. I didn’t know much about Marche except that it is a beautiful region and that they have amazing people and tasty food, but while researching the langua...

It’s time to talk grammar again. This time I would like to tackle a topic that seems pretty hard to grasp if you are learning Italian, but it comes natural to Italian speakers, even though the majority of us would not know how to explain it. “What is it?”, you ask. It’s Ne. I must say that this topic is pretty advanced, so if you’re a beginner, don...

Today, I am going to talk about a topic that’s a bit controversial, but very current: the Italianization of words. I’m talking about the current trend many Italians have of inventing new Italian words in order to replace existing words with “Italianized” English words. In this article you’ll find some examples that will help you better conceptualiz...

Hello everyone, and welcome back to the Italian language column. This month I am going to talk about music! Don’t worry, you are reading the right column, but I was inspired by all the videos of Italians singing at their windows, on their balconies, and to be honest we all need some music to make us happy in our lives nowadays! Since this column is...

Welcome back to our tour of Italy. This time we are landing in Tuscany, the beautiful hilly region famous for its charming hills and bucolic landscapes. But if you ask me, it’s for its absolutely lovely way of speaking and accent. As I told you a long long time ago, when I first introduced the Italian language to you, Italian comes from the Tuscan...

It’s grammar time! This month we will tackle the terrible and feared subjunctive! If you are familiar with Italian grammar, you probably know that Italian has some tenses that English does not have anymore. One of these tenses is congiuntivo, subjunctive. But how is it formed? When do you use it? Fear not, I am here to make it as clear to you as I...

It’s January 2020, a new year, a new beginning, a new era. This is the time of the year in which we make new resolutions and leave the past behind, so I thought it would be a good idea for some words that (thankfully) we left behind. I am talking about Italian words that were created during the Fascism regime when all foreign loan words were seen a...

Here we are again: the year is almost over and a new one will start soon. So, I thought I would take a good look at what expressions are typical of this period of time, of December, of Christmas, and generally speaking of the end of the year. Let’s begin!  First, let’s look at the month of December. Starting from the beginning, Italians say Santa L...

Here we are again on our trip to discovering all the different languages and dialetti of Italy. If my itinerary is correct, our next stop is the Liguria region, a very important republic even before Italy existed and homeland to many great traders and voyagers of the past. You probably know the most famous one – Cristoforo Colombo. Who? Pardon, I f...

In the past, we have already talked about the differences between the two main simple pasts in Italian: imperfetto and passato prossimo. We have already seen how imperfetto simply changes endings while passato prossimo is made up of the auxiliary, essere or avere ­plus the past participle. We have also talked about when to use one auxiliary and the...