As part of an ongoing effort to “save our stories,” Italian Cultural Center librarian Dominic Candeloro convened a roundtable discussion about a possible second volume of “Italian Women in Chicago: Madonna mia! QUI debbo vivere?” Published 10 years ago and spearheaded by Candeloro, the book features 40 accounts by scholars, journalists, freelance w...

To speak of Italo Calvino’s popularity outside of Italy is to speak of Calvino in translation, given that he has been read and loved abroad in other languages and not in Italian. For an author who floats, as Calvino himself said, “a bit in mid-air,” translation—that twofold and intermediate space—was his destiny. Let’s start with his Italian (or no...

We’re back for the second half of our incredible conversation with Ian MacAllen, the author of Red Sauce: How Italian Food Became American, as we continue our quest to understand the evolution of “Red Sauce Italian,” that unique cuisine born of the melding of Southern Italian tastes and American abundance. This week, in Part 2, we’ll take the conve...

Burgundy Bend Press recently announced the release of “The Italian Prisoner,” a work of historical fiction written by Elisa M. Speranza. Set in the Sicilian community of New Orleans’ French Quarter, the novel illuminates a true but little-known story involving Italian prisoners of war on the U.S. home front during WWII. “The Italian Prisoner” is an...

One of the themes of Rosemary and Bob Connelly’s married life was to “live cheap and make art.” The couple always enjoyed traveling and knew that when they did retire, they would want to visit many exotic places, leading them to live frugally while living and working in Phoenix in order to be able to spend their retirement years making art and trav...

In Washington DC, May has been proclaimed International Cultural Awareness Month. The observance celebrates global diversity with unique opportunities to experience other cultures. “There’s no better way to initiate dialogue than through cuisine,” says international chef Amy Riolo, “and cookbooks provide the perfect windows into all cultures.” In I...

Once in a long while, a book comes along and immediately qualifies as a “must have” in the Italian American home library. In Red Sauce: How Italian Food Became American, author Ian MacAllen has created one of those books! In this rollicking two-part episode, we’re joined by this proud Italian American writer as he leads us in an exploration of the...

According to his driver’s license, Charlie Sacchetti is 75 years old. In his mind, though, he’s a much younger man, dwelling forever in that magical age on the brink of adulthood, looking at the world through the youthful lens of limitless possibilities. That inner child, he reckons, is “probably between 18 and 21 years old.” “I like being a kid in...

On Wednesday, May 25th, The American University of Rome is proud to host Andrea Canepari as he presents his latest publication, "The Italian Legacy in Philadelphia: History, Culture, People, and Ideas" published by Temple University Press to the public and an invited audience at the Centro Studi Americani in Rome. Over a long and distinguished care...

In today's world, language is something extremely delicate. Whether it is good or bad, we gladly leave it to the readers' judgment. What is certain is that sensitivity is definitely higher than it used to be. Italian Americans have always been the object of nicknames and monikers that have never been positive, affectionate or friendly, as it could...