Giulia Casati

Giulia was born and raised in the North of Italy near Lake Como. After high school, she moved to the United States where she was an au pair and studied Liberal Arts at Essex County College. Then, she returned to Italy and continued her studies in Translation at the Civica Scuola Altiero Spinelli for translators and interpreters in Milan. She’s a language enthusiast, English and Italian in particular, she loves cooking, reading and growing plants.


Since Dante’s Week was a few weeks ago, I’ve decided to pay him homage for a bit longer. The Accademia della Crusca has been posting a word a day from his masterpiece, The Devine Comedy, in honor of the 700th anniversary of his death; and I must say, some are quite unexpected. So I decided to give you a tour of some of the most interesting words an...

March has finally arrived and spring is slowly making its way back into out lives. We’ve all spent over a year in this crazy timeline and it is now clear that our routine has changed, and perhaps our perception has also changed, but above all, our language has definitely changed. Let’s take a look at some Italian words that have made their way into...

Today, my dear friends, we are going to talk about you and I. What do I mean? Well, we are going to talk about subject pronouns. These teeny tiny words are used to express who is doing the action, and they are called subject pronoun because they actually are the subject of the sentence. They are used instead or names like Marco, Lucia and Cecilia,...

What am I saying? Isn’t this column supposed to be about Italian? Well, yes, but it’s also about Italy’s famous dialects, and today we are going to learn about one that maybe is not so famous: the “language” that is spoken in the region Valle d’Aosta, at the very north-west of Italy. What is it? Well, it’s kind of a complicated answer so let’s take...

Do you remember a few months ago when we talked about all the Italian expressions and sayings connected to food? Well, of course we said that food is a main component of Italian culture and tradition, so, why wouldn’t it be part of its language too? Well, there is another feature that is sometimes forgotten, but very important as well: vino! Oh, It...

Today we are going to talk about adjectives, all those words we use to describe an object or a person. In English it’s relatively a simple matter: the adjective (quality) always goes before the noun (object or person). For instance, the brown table will never be the table brown, or the old man won’t become the man old. Easy peasy.

Let’s jump to the north of Italy; let’s go to Milan! Milan l’è on gran Milan, a Milanese would say. Let’s debunk the idea that in the north people don’t speak dialects anymore, even in the city of Milan the dialect struggles but still survives. The Milanese language is a variation of the Longobard language, language that has been recognized by the...

We previously said that Italians really like to use food in their expressions, but what about body parts? For instance, the eyes are a big hit when trying to create metaphors or different expressions as well. You can easily hear conversations like “Luca is the light of my eyes!” “Oh Chiara, occhio! As soon as he gave you sweet eyes, you were lost,”...

As if Italian wasn’t hard enough with all its spelling rules and doubles, there are some additional little tidbits that complicate the issue. This is the case of the accento, the accent, or maybe a better word for it is “the stress” of the word. First of all, we must say that all words in Italian have an accent. Now, the Italian readers would say:...

Let’s continue on our journey around Italy and its beautiful dialects. We are now landing in the Italian capital: Rome or as you’d say in Italian, Roma. Roma’s dialect is very interesting because it’s more than a dialect, it’s considered more a way of speaking than a dialect due its similarities in grammar and form to standard Italian. In a way, Ro...

Italian life can be very vivid and colorful, especially now that summer is around the corner. The sun, the sea, the mountains…everything seems to be bright and full of life! Yes, but did you know that even the language has “colors”? Italian uses colors for so many everyday idiomatic expressions! Let’s take a look at a few of them together.

Italian. What a melodic language, full of musicality and love. Yeah, right. Then, let’s talk about the so-called “scioglilingua,” the incredibly infamous tongue twisters. Yes, because tongue twisters in Italian are not simply hard sentences to say, but many of them are seriously targeted to the weakest point of the language, and many people’s pronu...