Parliamo un po' di Jazz all'italiana, il libro che Anna Harwell Celenza ha scritto approfittando di un lungo soggiorno a Roma. Colpita dalla scena jazzistica nostrana la Celenza - docente di Storia della Musica e Radiogiornalismo alla Georgetown University – si è cimentata con la storia del jazz in Italia sino agli Anni Cinquanta. E dopo un meticol...

Debutantes for The Elenian Club’s 2018 Ballo di Natale received an ornament bearing the organization’s crest and became part of its interesting, 85-year history. According to the group, in 1934, Augusto P. Miceli was president of L'Unione Italiane and suggested formation of an American-Italian ladies club, “Circolo Femminile.” The group’s manifesto...

Rows upon rows of hills laced with vines intermingle with the curves of the G-clef: the history that has developed in Salaparuta is one-of-a-kind. With just under two thousand inhabitants, this municipality of Trapani is the symbol of the 1968 earthquake that occurred along the river Belice and destroyed the town’s historic center; but only a few p...

It was nearly midnight on Oct. 15, 1890, as David Hennessy, the young New Orleans police chief, walked home in a drizzle after a late meeting of the police board. Hennessy was without his usual armed escort as he approached the Basin St. house he shared with his widowed mother. The chief had use for bodyguards. In New Orleans, he was the face of...

Frances Xavier Cabrini, known universally as Mother Cabrini, founded the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. She established 67 missionary institutions, including one in New Orleans, to which she came in 1892. Exhibiting the energy for which she would become legendary, Mother Cabrini devoted herself to caring for the poor, especially I...

The American Society of Italian Heritage held it annual Rising Star Banquet at DiChristina's Restaurant. The organization includes members from all parts of the Northshore and several south shore members as well. Guest speaker was Professor Anthony Margavio, former University of New Orleans, Loyola University, and Southeastern Louisiana University...

I’ve spent a good part of 2018 writing about New Orleanians of Sicilian descent and their food. Inevitably, the discussion turns to “red gravy.” In New Orleans, many of us call our spaghetti sauce by that moniker, which is a term new-to-town Italians find confusing. That includes chef Giovanni "Gio" Vancheri of Villa Vancheri in Mandeville, who in...

Picture it: A farmhouse kitchen in the 1950s Sicilian countryside.  At the stove is Marianna Impastato. At her elbow is her son Sal. Atop that stove is a huge pot of simmering onions. As the onions turn translucent and shiny with olive oil, she adds minced fresh garlic; pig’s feet go in and gallons of crushed fresh Italian tomatoes.  Who would enjo...

Creole-Italian restaurants blessedly still thrive in New Orleans, with their red gravies and Gulf seafood, but they’re no longer, as they were just a decade ago, the only games in town. Paladar 511 is the most recent perfect expression of the alternative that’s emerged. I call the cooking Italian because a sizable percentage of it takes the form of...

On March 14, 1891 eleven Italian-Americans were lynched in New Orleans by a mob waving the Confederate flag who had been whipped up into believing that New Orleans Police Chief David Hennessey had been murdered by "the dagoes." It is from this incident that the term "mafia" entered the American lexicon as the thugs who lynched these 11 men, who had...